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Old 03-22-2006, 07:22 PM
IraParis IraParis is offline
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What\'s The Correct White Point ? 5000K or 6500K

I'm just getting into profiling my monitors with the Gretag Macbeth / Pantone Eye One Display 2.
I'm running Win XP Pro, and will be calibrating both my laptop and CRT monitor.
What's the correct white point setting? 5000K Warm White or 6500K Medium White?
I can't seem to find a definitive answer, so any and all help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks.




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Old 03-22-2006, 08:34 PM
Edmund_Ronald Edmund_Ronald is offline
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Re: What\'s The Correct White Point ? 5000K or 6500K

[ QUOTE ]
I'm just getting into profiling my monitors with the Gretag Macbeth / Pantone Eye One Display 2.
I'm running Win XP Pro, and will be calibrating both my laptop and CRT monitor.
What's the correct white point setting? 5000K Warm White or 6500K Medium White?
I can't seem to find a definitive answer, so any and all help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks.

[/ QUOTE ]

The "usual" settings nowadays are a whitepoint of 6500K and a gamma of 2.2. I myself have reverted to a setting of 5000K and a gamma of 1.8, and this is now what I recommend to clients, but then I've always been a contrarian ...

There is no definitive answer - it really depends on your work environment.

Edmund

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Old 03-22-2006, 08:58 PM
Ed_Foster_Jr Ed_Foster_Jr is offline
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Re: What\'s The Correct White Point ? 5000K or 6500K

Ira,

At the incept of hardware monitor calibration, I started with 5,000k and 1.8 gamma and it worked well. Over the past couple of years I switched (mostly) to 6,500k and 2.2 which also seems to work well. I believe in part it depends on your final destination, eg. fine art or other in house reproduction or mechanical reproduction (press) or web use. I use a Sony Artisian and can switch on the fly, so I now use 5,000k and 1.8 for press work and 6,500k and 2.2 for fine art print work and web use and that seems to suit my conditions well. You might just pick one or the other and give it try for a while and see what your results and thoughts are.

Good Luck,
Ed Foster, Jr.
www.digitalrailroad.net/edfoster

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Old 03-22-2006, 10:40 PM
Serge_Cashman Serge_Cashman is offline
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Re: What\'s The Correct White Point ? 5000K or 6500

I've only recently switched to calibrated workflow and the epiphany for me was that the main part of it was the measurment part. No matter what you select the output gets measured and recorded in the profile. And then passed along to other software. So a lot of what you select is up to you.

For most LCDs (including laptops) there is a technical advantage in using Native (rather then 6500 or whatever). Because if you have to adjust color temperature manually the display will be able to display less values which in some conditions would cause visible color banding. However if it looks off-white to you (as it does on one of my monitors) you may chose to correct it.

Personally I'd select whatever white point looks white to me (native 6512K on my first LCD monitor looks white enough). I've always been puzzled by posts like "after calibration the monitor looks too blue" - now I know that all they need to do is select a wp target that is less blue.

Again, I'm pretty new to this.

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Old 03-23-2006, 03:43 AM
Simon_Tindemans Simon_Tindemans is offline
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Re: What\'s The Correct White Point ? 5000K or 6500

Ira,

I don't think there is a definite answer. You should try and see which temperature works best for you. In general there are two situations in which you will find yourself: 1) looking only at the monitor and 2) comparing the image on screen to prints. Usually, (1) requires a little higher temperature than (2), assuming D50 lighting.

For me, I found that 5500K gives me the best print matching, but I've recently switched to 6000K because that temperature looks most neutral to me when I work only on the screen (120 cd/m2), which is what I do most of the time.

The gamma is not important for color matching purposes, assuming that the color management engine does a proper job. Adobe's engine has some problems when softproofing with gamma curves in the deep shadows, so gamma 1.8 is sometimes said to be better. I switched to using an sRGB-curve (approx 2.2, but with a little bump in the shadows) to get around this. However, the difference is small, and you might want to stick to the 'standard' 2.2, to make your desktop look the way it was intended.

Cheers,
Simon

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Old 03-23-2006, 08:15 AM
John_Luke John_Luke is offline
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Re: What\'s The Correct White Point ? 5000K or 6500

The old school prepress standard in the US was to run a monitor at 5000K. This was to match the 5000K viewing booths. Now, even the color management gurus are backpeddaling on that, even before LCDs became the norm. 6500k became the new standard for a couple of reasons. First of all, running a CRT at 5000K gave it a hopelessly dingy look, and viewing in a cave became the practice of the day. Cranking it up to 6500K gave it more "oomph", greater color purity, and more. And what about the 5000K viewing booths? Well, there was never an exact match from monitor to print anyway because one was transmissive, the other reflective. The practice is to no longer have your booth by you monitor, but rather evaluate the monotor and print independently upon their own merits. Now with LCDs taking over, many just seem to operate better at 6500K.

The gamma issue is a holdover from the original Mac days. In a color managed application like Photoshop or Phase One CO, you can dial in and profile your monitor to whatever gamma you want, and the image will render properly. However, non-colormanaged apps will look lighter or darker. Modern monitors are designed to perform best at a gamma of 2.2, so the further away you deviate from that, you increase your risk of defects like banding occuring.

I run my Eizo at 5000K @ 1.8. I do a lot of studio work under tungsten lighting, and that 5000K has a similar look and feel to what I see under my lights. 6500K looks too blue in my situation. However, when I travel with just a laptop and do interiors, etc., I use 6500K as 5000K appears yellow/muddy when viewed in a daylight surrounding. I just left the gamma at 1.8 as my Eizo seems to perform identically at 1.8 and 2.2.

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Old 03-23-2006, 10:08 AM
Vance_James
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Re: What\'s The Correct White Point ? 5000K or 6500

I run my Lacie's 19" CRT moniters at 1.8 and 6000k. This matches my Labs prints as close as possible. The Lab sets their moniters to 6500k which to me is too warm. The gamma thing kinda is confusing. I thought that Macs color management was for 1.8 and Windows was 2.2? The Lab uses all Windows and they started at a gamma of 2.2, which quickly went to 1.8 as the desired gamma setting. They are running DP2 software for their printers, Lambda, Theta, and Zetas, does the software determine the final gamma or does the printer determine this? I know you can change these settings when you calibrate the printers, however when the printers start drifting, do they drift less from 1.8 than 2.2? The reason I ask is, a friend of mine runs Timestone software for 2 Noritzus and a Melinka and Chromira.
They run all Windows Apps and their gamma is set at 2.2? I'm wondering does the operator of the system really determine the gamma setting or does the software or the printer? Just kinda curious, no one yet has been able to answer this for me. Thanks.

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What is 5000K VS 6500K? This thread Refback 03-16-2013 05:46 AM
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